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Take a Look at Geezer Music Club

One of the music blogs I follow is Geezer Music Club (go to http://geezermusicclub.wordpress.com) which is hosted by Big Geez. It is an impressive compendium of reviews, photos, film clips and history on great performers. He has a lot of the old, as well as good info on the new and contemporary.

What prompts this mention is a piece posted by Big Geez on February 9, 2009 about one of my old favorites from the 50’s and early 60’s, Lloyd Price. Here is a brief bit of that post:

One
of the hardest-working R&B stars to come out of the New Orleans
area during the Oldies era would have to be Lloyd Price, who even today
– after more than fifty years of performing – still has a few irons in
the fire.

Growing up in nearby Kenner, young Lloyd’s education in the music of
New Orleans included everything from singing in his church choir to
hanging around the jukebox in his mother’s small restaurant. While
still in his teens, he joined with his brother Leo to form a local
musical group that eventually began to draw wider attention, and led to
a 1952 recording session — one of historical significance.

With a moonlighting Fats Domino handling the piano, Lloyd sang what
would become one of the all-time classics of New Orleans R&B music
lp“Lawdy
Miss Clawdy.” It made the young singer a star, and when he followed up
with several other good songs, including “Tell Me Pretty Baby,” and
“Ain’t It a Shame,” he appeared to be on his way to a long career.

You get the idea. This is just the start of a very informative article that includes a sound clip of “I’m Gonna Get Married,” and a video of Lloyd performing “Personality” live.

Geezer Music Club is, obviously, the product of a deep appreciation for music history coupled with a lot of very fine work. Do yourself a favor and check it out. Just don’t replace me on your list of favorites, okay?

thejazzmonger

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About thejazzmonger
Music fan. All types of music but, especially Jazz, Big Band, Swing & Oldies from the 50s & early (pre-Beatle) 60s.

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